The urban look(in) point 

FINAL DEGREE PROJECT
The urban look(in) point is a criticism towards the traditional format and function of the lookout point as a place where you contemplate the whole as opposed to the detail. It questions what happens when the look-out point becomes a look-in point and what you perceive is not the city skyline as a whole but just a part. It is about looking back at the city from a different point of view. This project considers Centre Point as the protagonist and questions the implications of fragmenting its mass and
distributing it around the city, focusing on the way in which these exploded fragments seek to look back at their origin. Therefore both the proposals in this project look back exclusively at Centre Point and nothing else. The urban look(in) point is about self-reflection. It is about how we see Centre Point and about how Centre Point sees itself. It is about shifts in contemplation and changing horizons. It is about the whole and about the fragmented.

THE CONCEPT 

This image illustrates the hypothetical distribution of components of Centre Point from a central location to different areas in London, and the way in which it could combine with other components to form the Look(in) Points.

FRAMING VIEWS 

Sketch showing the exploration of the concept around the idea of focusing the view out of the Look(in) Points solely on Centre Point.

FOCUS ON CENTRE POINT 

This image explores the idea of Centre Point gazing at itself, almost like a reflection.

SITE 1 

CENTRAL SAINT MARTINS / THE JOURNEY
The space becomes lower and tighter as you make your way through the Look(in) Point coming out of the 11th floor of Central Saint Martins in Holborn, central London.
The series of vertical panels are meant to create an internal space that leaves you no option but to get lower and lower until you reach the point were you are at the height from where all you can see is Centre Point out of the front opening.

SITE 1 / VISUAL  

A visual of the finished intervention, as seen from outside, on the Central Saint Martins site.

SITE 1/ THE COMPONENTS 

Exploded isometric showing the components that make up the Look(in) point at Central Saint Martins.

SITE 1 / THE VIEW 

In the Central Saint Martins site the space is used vertically. Because the viewpoint area is so low (at 35cm from the ground) the idea is that the space becomes gradually smaller, and therefore the user is forced to bend down until he or she can only lie down and that’s the moment when Centre Point appears.

SITE 2 

STAVE HILL / THE JOURNEY
In the case of Stave Hill, in Canada Water, the internal journey is informed by a gradual appearance of the final frame where Centre Point can be seen in its totality. The breakdown of space in this case is horizontal, because the final image of centre point is located at a high point. Therefore, when going up the steps, and through different wall openings, the final image starts to appear in bits.The image is therefore fragmented throughout most of the experience and the journey is shaped by a systematic partition of the space through the wall panels.

SITE 2 / VISUALS 

A set of visuals of the finished intervention, as seen approaching Stave Hill, in Canada Water.

SITE 2 / THE COMPONENTS 

Exploded isometric showing the components that make up the Look(in) point at the Stave Hill site in Canada Water.

SITE 2 / THE VIEW 

An internal image of the intervention in Stave Hill, showing the view towards Centre Point, which, in contrast to the Central Saint Martins site, is much more distant and barely noticeable.